How to check my CPU Temperature using PowerShell Remotely

Thought it would be helpful to share how to remotely check your Computer temperature especially when you have a computer at home and you want to track if it is HOT. Just in case you don’t want to burn your computer etc etc, for whatsoever reason.

Well. Steps below show you how to do that! Make sure your client machine (the one that you are using) has PowerShell version 2.0 and above (well most of the Windows nowadays has it already). Just do a Search in your program menu and you should see it

  1. First of all, ensure your target computer (the one sitting at home that you want to check) has Firewall Turn off (not recommended). Alternatively, set Exception rules for WMI rules.
    Very briefly, go to “wf.msc” – Windows Firewall of the target computer and enable Inbound Rules for “Windows Management Instrumentation (WMI-In)” – Profile: Domain.
    remotely check cpu temperature - 1
    See detail steps here 
  2. Once firewall is cleared, make sure you have local administrator rights account that can query the CPU temperature in the target computer. (this one is simple) Fire “lusrmgr.msc” in the Run command.
    Check the “Administrators” group and make sure your account is the member.
  3. In order for you to be able to remotely check your computer temperature, you must have connectivity to your target computer. I believe there could have many way you can have connectivity to your target computer. Of what I know, the below three should be enough to fulfill the task
    1. One that I always like to use is Teamviewer. With this, you can easily establish VPN or remotely login to run the script mention in Step 4. (without specifying the -Computer and -Credential).
      Make sure when you install the Teamviewer, you have the VPN Driver installation option ticked.
    2. Allowing RDP to your target computer from public IP. In this option, you need to configure your Home Router to allow port 3389 to hit your target computer. Please go to your router admin page (usually ends of 192.168.0.1 or  192.168.1.1 depending on which is your subnet) and configure port forwarding to your private IP.
      In this way, you will be doing the same steps as option 1 where the only difference is you remotely accessing your home computer and run the script directly onto the target computer. Again, without specifying the -Computer and -Credential parameter in step 4)
    3. Option 3 is kinda most complete one and if you want to learn a little bit deeper for WMI. In this option, you will be granting DCOM port (135) and a fixed port (24158) port forwarding to your remote compute (which is accessible via public IP like what you’ve done in option 2). Refer here for how to fix WMI port.Screen shot example on how I configured the WMI to fixed port. (please pardon the typo)
      configure WMI to fixed port
      At the end of the day, your target computer but be accessible via DCOM port and WMI port from public IP.
  4. Open PowerShell via Administrator rights and run the following PS command

    Get-WmiObject MSAcpi_ThermalZoneTemperature -Namespace “root/wmi” -ComputerName “<IP of your target computer>” -Credential (Get-Credential)

    You will be prompted to specify the credential, use the account that you have administrator rights mentioned in step 2 above.
  5. You should be expecting response like screen below
    remotely check cpu temperature - 3
  6. Look for “CurrentTemperature” and the value is in Celsius

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